Open Letter to Professional Athletes Attempting to Make a Statement Against Racial Oppresion

Dear Athletes,
Today as I see photos of many of you on your knees on September 11, 2016 instead of on your feet, I am praising God that we live in a country where you are free to do just that. I am tremendously grateful to my Father in heaven for the freedom to make a statement without fear of repercussion from the government. However, I am also saddened by method you’ve chosen.

You see, like you, I often want to make a statement. I want to stand up for my Savior. I want to stand up for injustice and inequality. I want to stand up for scriptural values. But unlike you, I don’t have the platform or the fame for my statements to carry as far as you do.

You’ve made a statement, but unfortunately, it’s hollow. You are disrespecting an entire nation! Your statement tells me you don’t respect my uncles who died to help free your ancestors. Your statement tells me that my uncle who traveled underground for fear of his life when he stood up against slavery doesn’t matter. Your statement may be about black oppression, but to most of us it says “I don’t respect the majority of Americans who are trying to do the right thing.”

Yes, there is still racial oppression. No, our country is not perfect. However, the stand you are taking (or not taking) appears to be against the majority instead of the minority. The majority of police officers are not racially biased. They may be culturally biased in order to protect themselves, but for most it has nothing to do with race. The majority of employers do not look at race when they are hiring, most don’t care about color or ethnicity, most want anyone with integrity and a good work ethic.

If you want to take a real stand, use your platform to teach young people how to be more respectful. Help them see that we have to stand together and forget about race. Help them see there are good people who don’t care about race, help them search out those folks. Help them see that employers can’t afford to hire people who are going to cry “racism” every time someone of another race legitimately gets ahead. Go into the areas of oppression. Help train young people to be people of integrity, people of respect. Turn the tide, create a new culture the police don’t have to be afraid of. Be there with them when the police come out and show them how to treat good and bad officers with respect. Help them see that the best way to expose bad cops is to be respectful in large groups. Someone will be videoing . . . there always is. If the whole group is respectful and the cop is still a bad cop, they can take them down . . . one by one. If you want to take a real stand, take it against those of your race who are making all the rest who live in that same culture look bad. Let’s face it, every race, every profession, every ethnicity has that minority who make the rest of us look bad.

I want to expose people who I am linked to racially and culturally who have no integrity. I want people to know that even though I am an evangelical Christian, I do not support people who bully or belittle those who do not share my faith or values. I don’t do this by disrespecting those who are trying to do what is right!

If all of us who are like minded about people being treated with respect all just did that and showed the next generation to do that, we could make a huge difference. We need to stand together and teach the young people of this nation how to respect others . . . and most especially themselves. This business of showing disrespect because ONE other person showed disrespect has got to stop! You have the power and the platform to do it! And standing out of respect for those who’ve lost their lives defending your freedom and for a nation that, even with all its faults, is still the best place to live is a good start.

Your “stand” is dividing. Your “stand” is teaching young people to show disrespect. Your “stand” is your right! But it is not against those whom you are against. Those people don’t care! The people who are oppressing your race will oppress mine too if it serves their purpose. The people who are oppressing your race don’t care about the flag, the National Anthem or America. You are not hurting them. Those people are small minded, hateful individuals with no loyalty and no heart. The best thing we can do is to truly STAND and stand together.

Punishment or Pronouncement

I was thinking about Genesis 3 today. Most of the time people think of Genesis 3:14-19 as a word of punishment from God. But I wondered today if it was more of just a pronouncement of what was going to happen in the future.

In the NIV and the KJV, only God’s word to the serpent, “I will put enmity . . .” and his first words to Eve, “I will increase you pain . . .” include words that indicate God might be punishing. The rest of the passage makes it sound as if the sin released into the world caused the problem. “Cursed is the ground because of you . . .” Are those words of punishment, or a pronouncement of the consequences of sin?

“Your desire will be for your husband, and he will rule over you.” Punishment or pronouncement? When I read the first two chapters of Genesis, I get the feeling that God meant for husband and wife to be equal partners, to make one another better. But what if sin unleashed caused men through the ages to use the physical strength God gifted them with at creation to “rule over” the women, created with less physical strength, but different strengths to compliment the men’s strengths.

Much of the evil and bad things that happen today are primarily consequences of sin. Some, consequences for the person who created the evil. For others, their pain is the consequence of another’s sin. God doesn’t need to “punish” per se . . . we bring on trouble ourselves simply by stepping out of God’s will.

Hebrews 12 talks about God disciplining those He loves. Some would argue this means that God punishes, but discipline does not always mean punishment. Discipline more often means learning a lesson or doing a task to improve a skill. Discipline makes us a better person.

So . . . the whole thought process makes me wonder . . . did God tell Adam and Eve they were being punished or did He merely pronounce what He knew would happen because sin had been unleashed on the world?

What is a Christian?

I’m not going to call myself a Christian anymore. Instead I’d rather be known as a “close friend of Jesus Christ.” Everyone who has ever stepped foot in a church calls themselves a Christian, yet I wonder if many of them really know Jesus at all. You see, Jesus called those who do God’s will His brothers and sisters.

It made me think of the show “Blue Bloods.” The show is based around an Italian family whose “family business” is law enforcement. Even though the matriarchs of the family are both gone (mom and grandma have died), the entire extended family, sons, daughters, in-laws and grandchildren, gathers at least once a week for a family meal. They don’t miss unless they are working or on vacation. Nothing takes precedence over the family meal.

My family had a similar gathering pattern. As a child, I spent time with my maternal grandparents and great-grandparents at least weekly before they died. And my siblings and I were well aware we would be going to my paternal grandparents at least two Sundays a month. Grandma Meyer always had at least half a dozen pies waiting because all of the local aunts, uncles and cousins would be there by late afternoon.

The body of Christ is called to be a family. We are to be more than what the modern day church calls “Christian.” Hebrews 10 tells us to make sure we keep meeting together. I don’t want anyone to ever think that “marking attendance” is more important than a relationship with Jesus Christ, but the honest truth is part of the way we can measure how close we are to Christ is the priority we give to meeting with the “family.” If the following list was the criteria for for measuring your relationship, what would your category be?

Close Family or best friend – attends every Sunday plus Bible Study – corresponds to the Bible Apostles
Second cousin or casual friend – attends 75% of the time – corresponds to the Bible disciples
Close enough I should go to the funeral – attends 50% of the time – corresponds to the Bible followers
Comes to the annual family reunion – has a church to call home and goes when it’s convenient – corresponds to the Bible crowd

As you can tell by the third column, a lack of commitment by people who call themselves Christian has been going on since Jesus started His ministry. I’m sure the folks in the “crowd” thought they knew Jesus. They’d heard Him preach and eaten with Him on more than one occasion. These are the ones who lined the streets when they heard He was coming to town, but because they didn’t know Him like they thought they did, they are the same ones who stood in front of Pilate yelling, “Crucify Him!”

In case you’re wondering about the difference in disciples and followers, Mark 10 says that when they headed toward Jerusalem, the disciples were astonished, but the followers were afraid. Both groups knew that Jerusalem was a dangerous place for Jesus to be. Everyone was aware that the Jewish leaders wanted Jesus dead. So the disciples were surprised that Jesus was walking right into their headquarters, but they weren’t afraid. The disciples knew that Jesus had it under control. They’d not only seen Him work miracles, they believed that He could do things they couldn’t imagine. They weren’t afraid because they knew they were friends with the Son of God.

The followers on the other hand were frightened. What was going to happen to them if someone in Jerusalem found out they were following Christ? Should they keep it under wraps? Would they be better off distancing themselves from this man who calls Himself the Messiah? Following was a fun thing to do sometimes, the company of Jesus was an exciting place to be, but it wasn’t a priority. It is easy for a follower to fall away because the commitment level just isn’t there.

But if you read Mark 10:32 closely you see that the highest level of commitment is where we all should want to be. Jesus “took the Twelve aside and told them what was going to happen.” They had the inside scoop. The apostles were Christ’s closest friends, His confidants! That is the circle I want to be in. It’s the circle Joshua chose thousands of years before (Joshua 24:15). It’s the circle Moses and Abraham walked in. This is the circle founded by those folks from Hebrews 11.

This is why the leadership of our church (and probably yours) emphasizes church attendance. We don’t care about the numbers. It’s not a notch on our belt or bragging rights. We don’t want you to come because we want your money. We want you to be in worship and Bible Study because we know that’s where the Apostles are. We want you to be in the inner circle, the core, the ones closest to Christ. We want you to be the first ones to get a Word from Him, we want you to be His confidants.
All four of those categories (and even a few who think they are “good people” but don’t even have a church home) call themselves Christian. Yes, I am a Christian, but I prefer that you think of me as Jesus’ closest friend, His confidant, His family.

Sermon from Pentecost 2016

Acts 2:1-21

Today is Pentecost. It’s the anniversary of that piece of history we just read in Acts. Most of you already know it’s my favorite holiday on the church calendar. And a lot of you have already heard my Holy Spirit story, and the rest, if you ever want to hear it, just ask, I love to share. But to give you an idea of why I believe the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost is so exciting, let me tell you a little about what has happened since that day.

You see it was the Holy Spirit took a disciple who denied Christ and feared for his life into the very first leader of the world wide church. It was the Holy Spirit that took one of the first and most famous persecutors of the early church, a man named Saul, and turned him into Paul, the most famous Christian preacher of all time, the man who wrote the majority of the New Testament. It’s that same Holy Spirit that took a young shy girl, one who would never stand up in front of a small group, let alone a large one and put her in front of you today.

It’s the Holy Spirit that takes all Christians from, as Oswald Chambers puts it, “Saved from hell to saved for a purpose.” I believe it’s the absence of the Holy Spirit in churches and Christians that is causing churches to die and Christians to lose hope. Without the Holy Spirit Christianity is hard work. Being a Christian without the fullness of the Holy Spirit sometimes doesn’t feel worth it. In fact, my confidence in Christ and my relationship with Him comes from allowing the Holy Spirit to move in my life.

Here at Sycamore Tree, we focus a lot on John 10:10: “The enemy comes to steal, kill and destroy, but Jesus came to bring abundant life.” A lot of people read or hear that verse and live like it’s the only verse in the Bible. And because they pick and choose which part of the Bible they want to live by, they wonder why they miss on out Abundant life.

Jesus came to give us an abundant, full, rich life. But in order to live an abundant life, we have to reach out and take hold of it. It’s our responsibility to live in such a way that allows the Holy Spirit to live within us so we can take hold of that abundant life.

At least nine times in the New Testament Jesus tells us the things we have to do to live in the abundant life that He promised in John 10:10. This is just four of those places.
Romans 6:63 63 The Spirit gives life; the flesh counts for nothing. The words I have spoken to you—they are full of the Spirit and life.
Romans 8:2 2 because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.
Romans 8:10 . . . the Spirit gives life because of righteousness
2 Corinthians 3:6 . . . the written law brings death, but the Spirit gives life.

The scripture is clear that if you want the abundant life Jesus promised, you need the Holy Spirit. He tells us that the things we do in the flesh are worth nothing, and trying to work your way to heaven brings death. But it consistently tells us that life comes from the Spirit. Galatians 5 tells us how to get peace and joy, but these are the fruit of the Spirit.

The truth of the matter is that as much as people want abundant life, most don’t really want the fullness of the Spirit. I know it’s a little scary, but it is so worth it.
And just in case you’re wondering what I mean by want it, let me use a couple of illustrations you’ll be more familiar with.

For example . . . I would love to be fit, but I just don’t want it bad enough. I want the benefit of exercise, but I am not really willing to do the work it takes to get fit.
Sylvia can tell you stories of students who WANT good grades, but they don’t want to do the homework it takes to GET the good grades.

It’s the same way with the Holy Spirit. You have to WANT abundant life enough to be willing to put yourself in a place where the Holy Spirit can work in you. But the Spirit, being a part of Christ, will never force Himself on you. The Holy Spirit is a gentleman, so if we want the fullness of the Spirit, we have to want it. Luke tells us we have to ask for it.

It can be a scary endeavor. It makes people afraid to ask for the Holy Spirit. But like me and Peter and Paul, once you allow the Holy Spirit to work in you, you will never be the same. Don’t worry, Jesus seldom changes your basic personality. After all, that’s the way He created you. But like a rock in a polisher, the Holy Spirit will often smooth of our rough edges so that the most beautiful part of you is more visible to the world.

Most of the steps that we have to take to allow the Spirit to work in us Steve has talked about over the last twelve weeks. You see the more we grow in our faith, the closer we are to Christ and the easier it is for us to allow Christ’s Spirit to work in us. Those little plants we took home two weeks ago give us a great example of what to do to make sure we can grow in the Spirit.

Prayer will always be the #1 means to access the Holy Spirit. Steve asked you every week if you’d prayed for your plant. And the truth is, praying for your plant wasn’t that important, but for most of us, if we only talk to God as often as most of us prayed for our plant, our relationship with Jesus will be failing. Luke makes it clear, we have to ask the Holy Spirit to work in our life.

The second thing you have to do is make your faith yours. I’ve found it amusing these last couple of weeks the stories we’ve heard about people who let someone else be in charge of their plant. Most times it didn’t go so well. The same is true of your relationship with Christ, and the ultimate relationship is the Holy Spirit because that is Christ living inside of you. No one but you can make that faith grow. Others can encourage you and help you, but you are the only one who can make room for the Spirit of Christ to grow inside of you. Steve can’t do it. I can’t do it. TEENS, your parents can’t do it. You are not too young or too old to begin to take responsibility for your faith and allow Christ to grow in your heart.

One of the top three things you need to do to experience real life in the Spirit is nourish your faith. Your plant needs water and sunshine and even a little Miracle Grow from time to time. Your faith needs nourishment too. And like your plant it needs it OFTEN and REGULARLY if you really want it to grow. You can’t just give it nourishment when you have time or remember. If you don’t feed the Spirit within you, it will shrivel. Paul compared it to a fire when he wrote to Timothy. In II Timothy 1:6 Paul told the young preacher to “fan into flame the gift of the Spirit.” What happens to a fire when you stop adding wood? The same thing happens to the Spirit within you when you quit feeding it. God’s Word is the food. If you aren’t reading or listening to it every day, you are letting the fire die. And in the 21st Century, there’s really no excuse. Besides the fact that Bibles are easy to come by, almost everyone has a smart phone, and there are at least two free Bible aps that will not only allow you to read scripture, they’ll also read it to you! Nope, no excuse!

Finally, and the most serious problem I see with most people who say they want to grow in Christ, you have to make it a priority. People say they want abundant life in Jesus Christ, but their priorities speak a different message. Just like being fit is not a big enough priority for me, faith is not a big enough priority for most.

A priority is something that is important to you. It’s something you put ahead of other things in your life. And truth is making a list of priorities and putting God at the top doesn’t automatically make it so. Your actions tell the world what your priorities are. I have been told that if you want to see what your priorities are get out your calendar and bank statement and make a list of the things you think about all day. No matter what you WANT your priorities to be, these three things will tell you what they really are.

If growing your faith and having life in the Spirit really are your priority, then it will be reflected in
• Your Church attendance
• Your tithing
• The time you spend in prayer and Bible reading (or listening) and study
• The gifts you give above your tithe to organizations that share Christ
• Your thoughts and the way they change as you grow
• Your language
• The Changes in the way you feel about things
• The people you spend time with

The Holy Spirit was first given to all believers on Pentecost right after Jesus’ resurrection. Before that only a handful of people got to experience the Holy Spirit the way we do now.

If you are a believer then the Holy Spirit has already been planted in you like those seeds Steve planted at the beginning of lent. But whether it stays in the ground or grows past a seedling is completely up to you. You have the opportunity to grow the Spirit into a huge tree that spreads out to comfort others and produce fruit, but what that seed becomes is completely up to you.
To paraphrase Joshua, “Choose for yourselves this day whether or not you want an abundant life through the Spirit of Jesus Christ. As for me . . . I want it all.” I praise God that when I make the effort, His Spirit grows in me and I know life . . . real, true, abundant life.

Thoughts on Growing Old

The fact that for centuries people have been trying to find the secret to eternal youth and living forever is just more proof that God is who He says He is. Te search for the fountain of youth and cryogenics are just two of the most famous endeavors to sustain our human bodies. The fact that we believe eternal life is possible or desirable is just more proof that we have been created by the Almighty with a deep-seated knowledge that this life is not going to end. Someplace far inside each human is the innate knowing that we were intended to exist forever. So, we seek to make it true. We strive through life-saving measures in medicine, foods we eat, fads we try, make-up, creams and more to stay young and last eternally here on this planet.

But as I watch the aging process in my dog and my mother-in-law, I wonder why it is we want to remain in this shell forever. Why do we attempt to prolong this part of eternity instead of gracefully moving on to the next stage in the promise of everlasting life?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not an “eyes on heaven” kind of person. In fact, I tell people all the time heaven isn’t enough to make me want to stay focused on Christ. It’s the blessings that following Him in this life bring that keeps me focused on His love that bought my redemption. But we talk about death as if it’s the end. We try to prolong our life here as if we’re being cheated if we die young (or even old).

Think of it this way . . . if you decided to go on a free cruise to the Bahamas, would you feel cheated because you missed your family while you were gone? And in heaven we won’t even miss anyone! I picture God’s timing (or the lack of time in heaven) to make it seem like we all get there at the same moment.

I’m not looking forward to the pain and “stuff” that growing old brings. Arthritis does not seem attractive, and I don’t want to lose my sight or my hearing. In fact, my vanity isn’t even looking forward to sagging skin and wrinkles.

On the other hand, I don’t want to think that death is the end or teach my grandchildren that it’s a sad thing. For a Christian death is like winning the lottery or a trip to your ultimate vacation destination, and it’s a place that the whole family is invited to come to someday if they want to! (I pray my whole family chooses to join me).

I don’t want to prolong the inevitable so far that I have no life here in the living. I see that so much. Just because we can put in a pacemaker, should we in every instance? I praise God for the technology that brings a quality life to those who have more to give. However, I wonder what our Savior thinks when we use the gift He’s given us to play God and keep the shell of a person breathing.

I’ll admit, I have more questions than answers about when it’s the right time to use the gifts and advances in medicine that God has blessed us with. All I do know is that I will never again say someone was “cheated’ just because they moved from this life to the presence of Jesus earlier than our human minds thought was fair. I will think twice, and pray with fervency before I automatically do “everything possible” to sustain this tent that we call a body. Instead I will remember these verses:
2 Corinthians 5:8 – We are confident, I say, and would prefer to be away from the body and at home with the Lord.
and
Revelation 14:13 – Then I heard a voice from heaven say, “Write this: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.”
“Yes,” says the Spirit, “they will rest from their labor, for their deeds will follow them.”

Guns . . . so controversial

I try really hard to never “attack” anyone on this blog or even make anything sound like I’m coming against any person. Instead I try to always keep my thoughts toward ideologies and such. This post may sound directed toward one person because of recent Facebook posts, and for that I’m sorry. But the sentiments are for just general and not meant to be attacking anyone. So, with that said . . .

There is a train of thought that believes that those who are pro-gun or own guns are fearful and/or angry. It’s a train I can’t get on and don’t believe, and I think those who truly embrace that ideology don’t really know true gun owners and their hearts. The majority of my friends own guns, use guns and/or collect guns. Not many (if any) are stock piling them. In fact, if you do the research, I’d venture to say that the stockpilers are those who own guns illegally or intend to use them for harm. Even if guns were banned from the United States, these folks would own and misuse deadly weapons.

Personally, I don’t know one angry or fearful gun owner. None of them live looking over their shoulder waiting for an opportunity to use a gun. However, like me, a person who doesn’t own a gun or choose to use a gun, they are cautious and vigilant, aware of their surroundings. I’m personally glad to know that there might be 25 people in a crowd of 100 who have a concealed carry. I know that should a crazy person come into the room threatening to injure innocents, they would be prepared. And I also know that if they could keep people safe without ever firing their weapon, all of my gun carrying friends would do so. Evidence shows that many times merely holding the “bad guy” at gunpoint until the authorities arrive is enough.

I’d like to ask those who are anti-gun, “Do you lock your doors at night? Do you lock your car at the mall or even in your drive?” If you answered yes to any of those three questions, I can’t help but wonder, “If you think my friends own guns because they are afraid or angry, are you afraid or angry when you lock those doors?” Because I lock my doors for the same reason my friends carry guns, not out of fear or anger, but because I want to be safe. My locks are because I am vigilant, because I know that there are people who don’t know Christ. There are people who are fearful and angry. I feel bad for them, but not bad enough to let them rob my house (hence a lock) or shoot up my family (hence a gun). If they allow me to help them (stop their behavior long enough for us to share love and respect), I would do that. But the church in Charleston, SC tried to share love with the young gentlemen who came into their service and it didn’t stop his behavior. Had he decided not to shoot up the place, those folks would have loved him into some self-esteem and understanding of how to live at peace with others. Instead, so many needlessly died. One gun on one church member could have probably held this young, troubled man at bay and perhaps allowed him to begin a healing process. Instead, even if he discovers the truth that his hatred and bigotry was wrong, he will always have to live with the blood on his hands. Jesus can forgive him, but will he ever be able to forgive himself?

Disarmament will only lead to government tyranny and giving power to the “bad guys”. You can hate guns. You can choose to not carry a gun. But to ask other sane, able bodied, caring people to lay down theirs is not only arrogant, but detrimental to your own safety. Believe me if you are in a movie theater and a gunman walks in, you’ll be thankful if the stranger sitting next to you ignored the “no concealed carry” sign when he came in the door.

Jesus is My Lord

The phrase “the Lord” has bothered me for years. I can’t even bring myself to say it. It sounds so patronizing to me. I’ve never understood my hesitation with the phrase. I only know that every time I hear it or see it, it sets off alarms inside of me. Yesterday, I finally discovered the root of my problem.

Now, before you read any further, I want to make sure you understand this is MY problem. I don’t think that those who use the phrase are blasphemous or disrespectful. This is simply my revelation into what makes me “me” and hopefully food for thought for those who might stumble across this blog and read it from time to time.

Yesterday I saw a sign that used the phrase, “the Lord.” I don’t even remember the rest of the sign because that phrase nagged at me. I didn’t think badly of the church that used the phrase, but I have a terrible time with it, and my thoughts were focused on the “why” of my struggle. It didn’t take very long for my decades long problem to finally find it’s source.

I discovered that in my life I am not comfortable using the article . . . Jesus cannot be THE Lord, it’s imperative that He is MY Lord. Obviously my problem can’t have it’s roots in any Biblical sources because the phrase is used at least 434 times in the New Testament alone (gotta love the internet searches). However, on more than one occasion Jesus described Himself as Lord, but seldom used the article (at least in the English – I’m not a Greek scholar, so I don’t have a clue what it might be in the original tongue).

Putting “the” before Lord will be used by much of the Christian world, and it will be perfectly acceptable. However, much like the ancient scribes could not write Yahweh without first washing their hands, I must reserve the word for the times I am talking about a personal relationship. Jesus Christ is My Lord and Savior, and I am grateful.

Thanksgiving Reflections (not necessarily Thanksgivings)

These are some thoughts I’ve had today that I would normally post on Facebook, but I don’t want to clutter anyone’s timeline with negativity on a day when even I want to see positive Thankful thoughts . . .

  • Does anyone else want to make a list of grammar corrections to send to NBC for the parade commentators . . . you know, things like subject/verb agreement . . . ?
  • I can’t trust someone who comes to America and refuses to celebrate Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is not a religious holiday, it is a national holiday. Even if you don’t believe in God, you can be thankful.
  • I’m protesting stores being open on Thursday, but putting stuff in my online shopping cart. Is that hypocritical since some IT person is working today because you know all of us protesting the stores being open are going to overload the Black Friday sites?

I may add to this list as the day goes by . . . but it will probably be kept short because I really am thankful!

So you want to hear God’s voice . . .

I get that from folks all the time . . . “If I could just hear God’s voice, if I only knew exactly what He wanted me to do . . . ”

Today as I contemplated that phrase, even in my own life, I sort of heard God’s voice! But what it said won’t be too impressive to most who aren’t hearing Him speak right now. Because what I believe I heard the voice of God say is, “Why should I say more to people who don’t listen to what I’ve already said?”

That really smacked me right in the face. In those times when I feel like I can’t hear God, how many of those days am I ignoring something He’s already told me. He gave us this wonderful book with all kinds of instructions and life lessons. There are stories to show us how NOT to live our life as well as so many that demonstrate the right way to do it. There are bold instructions on living throughout the entire book, how much do I ignore?

And what about those people who don’t even bother reading it? Why does one think they will hear the voice of Christ when he or she doesn’t even bother to read the things our Father has already entrusted us with?

God wants us to have the best life possible. He came to bring life filled up to the top and running over, but we can’t have it if we aren’t listening to the One in charge give us the full plan.

I encourage you to get into the Word this week. Find some of the things in there you aren’t quite living up to and just do it! Then do another one next week. Don’t forget to invite the Holy Spirit to help you with each thing you do (or you’ll be doing it in vain). And remember that the number one thing you have to do to hear God’s voice is to accept Jesus Christ as your Savior. Until you do that, that’s pretty much the only message you’ll hear.

What to do with the refugees?

I’ve had several people ask me about my Christian perspective on the current situations with the refugees entering the United States. It’s a difficult thing to process. As Christians we want to help people. On the other hand, most of us are terrified at the thought that we may be opening our doors to people who want to threaten, torture and kill our children and families. What is the “right” thing to do?

Here are my thoughts on the subject:

Jesus calls me to love MY enemies, the ones who have personally injured me, those who persecute me. (Matthew 5:43-48) I believe He told me this because He knew that hatred would eat me alive from the inside and keep me from Him.

However, I also believe the Bible also says that we should not befriend the enemies of God. (James 4:4) I believe it’s not my place to judge who the enemies of God are. But when people say outright that they are God’s enemies, when they violently and maliciously attack the followers of God, then they have announced to the world that they are God’s enemies, and I am not obligated to befriend them. I will not Hate them because that only damages me, but I also will not befriend, condone or protect them. I feel bad for the innocents in the midst of those who are murderers, but I don’t think it’s right to put our children in danger in order to protect those children. If we could help them without putting our own families in danger, that would be great. The Bible says that the one who doesn’t help his own family is worse than an unbeliever. (I Timothy 5:8) I believe protecting my family falls under that. I just don’t see how to protect my family and our country without excluding some innocents. It’s sad, but until they come up with a more foolproof solution, I believe excluding all refugees from countries where professing enemies of God want to immigrate from is the only answer.

[edited and added to on 12/5/2015] The other problem I have with the refugees is the story of the Israelites not following God’s command to rid their country of those who worshipped other Gods. I know it sounded cruel, but the Bible says that the reason God commanded it is because the evil of those nations had “reached it’s fullness.” Much like the Israelites, I fear that America isn’t strong enough to withstand the temptation to follow other gods. Edmund Burke said that those who forget history are doomed to repeat it. Looking at the level of faith in the United States, I don’t believe we are following Christ closely enough to overcome those who would like to bring another “god” into our country. Already people are being led astray by those who call themselves Christian but are clearly not. Americans are being lured into Islam, and even paganism. The only thing not growing (as far as I personally can see) is Atheism. The enemy must finally have realized that we were all created for God. He must know that atheism is not attractive, but following a “god,” even a false one, is. Until the church steps up and becomes the church, gets outside the walls and starts loving people to Christ, we are not ready for foreign refugees, most especially those whose mission is to destroy Christianity (even though it can never be destroyed) and proselytize a nation who has “forgotten the heights from which she has fallen.” [end of edit]

The Bible does not ask us to lie down and be doormats. It does not ask us to invite in those who want to destroy God’s people. It asks us to care for those who have lost their way and are looking for the way back to God. Those I will help. There are plenty of downtrodden already in our country. I think once we have every single person in America in a decent home and making a modest living then we can start inviting in these others, but we have plenty of “angels unaware” lying on our streets already. Bringing in new ones won’t make us better people, it will just make the few who are already helping people stretched even thinner